Crochet Stitch Patterns With Charts

Crochet Stitch Patterns With Charts

Crochet is a craft that uses a hook and yarn to create fabric from a series of loops. Crochet stitch patterns are the combinations of stitches that create different textures and designs in the fabric.

The stitch patterns can be written in words symbols, or both. Symbols are often easier to follow than words, especially for complex patterns. Symbols also allow crocheters to see how the stitches look in relation to each other.

The stitch charts are diagrams that use symbols to represent each stitch and how they are worked.

Crochet stitch charts are read from right to left for right-handed crocheters and left to right for left-handed crocheters. Each row or round of the chart corresponds to a row or round of the pattern.

In this article, we will look at some examples of crochet stitch patterns with charts, and explain how to read and follow them.

We will also provide some tips and resources for finding more crochet stitch patterns with charts.

Example 1: Single Crochet

Single crochet is one of the simplest and most common crochet stitches. It creates a dense and sturdy fabric that is suitable for many projects.

To make a single crochet stitch, insert the hook into the next stitch, yarn over, pull up a loop, yarn over again, and pull through both loops on the hook.

The chart below shows a sample of single crochet fabric. The symbol for a single crochet is a small cross or plus sign.

The chart reads from right to left for odd-numbered rows, and from left to right for even-numbered rows. The numbers on the side indicate the row number, and the numbers on the bottom indicate the stitch number.

Single Crochet
Single Crochet is easy to make.

The first row is the foundation chain, which is the base for the rest of the fabric. The foundation chain has one more stitch than the number of single crochet stitches in each row.

To follow the chart, start by making a foundation chain of 11 stitches. Then, work the first row of single crochet by inserting the hook into the second chain from the hook, and making a single crochet stitch in each chain across.

You should have 10 single crochet stitches at the end of the row. Turn your work, and chain one to start the next row.

Work the second row of single crochet by inserting the hook into the first stitch, and making a single crochet stitch in each stitch across.

Repeat this process for the remaining rows, following the direction of the chart. You should have a square of single crochet fabric with 10 stitches and 10 rows.

Example 2: Double Crochet

Double crochet is another basic and versatile crochet stitch. It creates a taller and looser fabric than single crochet, and it can be used for many projects.

To make a double crochet stitch, yarn over, insert the hook into the next stitch, yarn over, pull up a loop, yarn over, pull through two loops on the hook, yarn over again, and pull through the remaining two loops on the hook.

The chart below shows a sample of double crochet fabric. The symbol for double crochet is a T-shaped sign.

The chart reads the same way as the single crochet chart, but the foundation chain has two more stitches than the number of double crochet stitches in each row.

This is because the first three chains count as the first double crochet stitch of the row.

Double Crochet
You can learn to Double Crochet easily.

To follow the chart, start by making a foundation chain of 12 stitches. Then, work the first row of double crochet by yarning over, and inserting the hook into the fourth chain from the hook.

Make a double crochet stitch in each chain across. You should have 10 double crochet stitches at the end of the row. Turn your work, and chain three to start the next row.

The chain three counts as the first double crochet stitch of the row. Work the second row of double crochet by yarning over, and inserting the hook into the second stitch

Make a double crochet stitch in each stitch across, until you reach the last stitch. In the last stitch, make a double crochet stitch in the top of the chain three from the previous row.

Repeat this process for the remaining rows, following the direction of the chart. You should have a square of double crochet fabric with 10 stitches and 10 rows.

Example 3: Shell Stitch

Shell stitch is a decorative crochet stitch that creates a scalloped pattern of clusters of stitches.

It can be used for edgings, borders, or as a main stitch pattern. There are many variations of shell stitch, but the basic idea is to work multiple stitches in the same stitch or space and skip some stitches or spaces in between.

The number and type of stitches in each shell, and the number of stitches or spaces skipped, can vary depending on the desired effect.

The chart below shows a sample of shell stitch fabric. The symbol for the shell stitch is a fan-shaped sign.

The chart reads the same way as the previous charts, but the foundation chain has a multiple of six stitches plus one.

This is because each shell consists of five double crochet stitches, and each shell is separated by one skipped stitch or space.

To follow the chart, start by making a foundation chain of 25 stitches. Then, work the first row of shell stitch by skipping the first three chains, and making five double crochet stitches in the next chain.

This counts as the first shell. Skip the next two chains, and make a single crochet stitch in the next chain.

Shell Stitch
Shell Stitch is simple to make.

Skip the next two chains, and make another shell of five double crochet stitches in the next chain.

Repeat this pattern of skipping two chains, making a single crochet stitch, skipping two chains, and making a shell, until you reach the end of the row.

You should have four shells and three single crochet stitches at the end of the row. Turn your work, and chain three to start the next row.

Chain three counts as the first double crochet stitch of the first shell. Work the second row of shell stitches by making four double crochet stitches in the same stitch as chain three.

This completes the first shell. Skip the next two stitches, and make a single crochet stitch in the next stitch, which is the middle stitch of the shell from the previous row.

Skip the next two stitches, and make another shell of five double crochet stitches in the next stitch, which is the single crochet stitch from the previous row.

Repeat this pattern of skipping two stitches, making a single crochet stitch, skipping two stitches, and making a shell, until you reach the end of the row.

You should have four shells and three single crochet stitches at the end of the row. Repeat this process for the remaining rows, following the direction of the chart.

You should have a rectangular piece of shell stitch fabric with four shells and 10 rows.

Conclusion

Crochet stitch patterns with charts are a great way to learn new stitches and create beautiful projects.

Understanding chart symbols and row directions makes charts easy to follow. They also help visualize fabric texture and spot mistakes.

Crochet stitch patterns with charts can be found in books, magazines, websites, blogs, and social media platforms.

You can also create your own charts using software or online tools. Crochet stitch patterns with charts are a fun and rewarding way to express your creativity and skill with crochet.

Learn more about Knitting with Beads: Stunning Shawls & Wraps.

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