How Do You Add A Stitch In Knitting?

How Do You Add A Stitch In Knitting?

Knitting is a creative craft that involves the creation of fabric by interlocking loops of yarn with the help of needles.

Sometimes, you may want to add a stitch in knitting to increase the width of your fabric, shape your garment, or create a decorative pattern.

Adding a stitch in knitting is also known as increasing, and there are many ways to do it.

In this article, we will show you one of the simplest and most common methods: the knit front and back (KFB) increase.

What Is The KFB Increase?

The KFB increase is a way of adding a stitch in knitting by working into the same stitch twice.

It is also called the bar increase because it creates a horizontal bar of yarn between two stitches.

How Do You Add A Stitch In Knitting?
You can Add A Stitch In Knitting.

The KFB increase is easy to do and does not leave any holes in your fabric.

However, it is not very invisible, so it may not be suitable for some patterns that require a smooth and even surface.

How To Do The KFB Increase?

To do the KFB increase, you will need to know how to knit a basic stitch. You can check out this tutorial if you are unfamiliar with the knit stitch.

Here are the steps to do the KFB increase:

  1. Knit the stitch as usual, but do not slip it off the left needle.
  2. Insert the right needle into the back loop of the same stitch, from right to left.
  3. Wrap the yarn around the right needle and pull it through the back loop.
  4. Slip the stitch off the left needle. You have now created two stitches from one.

When To Use The KFB Increase?

The KFB increase is a versatile and simple increase that can be used in many knitting projects. Here are some examples of when you may want to use the KFB increase:

  • To add stitches at the beginning or end of a row, such as when shaping the sleeves or neckline of a sweater.
  • Add stitches evenly across a row, such as when making a triangle shawl or a blanket.
  • To create decorative stitches like eyelets, bobbles, or cables.

Tips And Tricks For The KFB Increase

Here are some tips and tricks to help you master the KFB increase and make your knitting look better:

  1. Count your stitches before and after each increase row to ensure you have the correct number.
  2. To avoid confusion, use a stitch marker to mark the first and last stitch of each increase row.
  3. If you want to make the bar less visible, you can knit it through the back loop on the next row. This will twist the stitch and make it tighter.
  4. If you want to make a symmetrical increase, you can use the KFB increase on each increase row’s second and second-last stitch. This will create a neat and even edge.

Yarn Over (YO) Increase

Yan also add a stitch in knitting by increasing Yarn over.

Here are the easy steps:

  • Position the yarn: Hold the yarn in your right hand as if you were going to knit.
  • Create a yarn over: Instead of knitting into the next stitch, simply bring the yarn to the front of the work, then over the right needle to the back. This creates a loop around the right needle.
  • Continue with the next stitch: Knit the next stitch as you normally would.
  • Be mindful on the next row: When you come across the yarn over on the next row, knit or purl it as a regular stitch. This prevents creating holes in your fabric.

The yarn over increase is often used in lace knitting and creates a decorative hole in the fabric.

Conclusion

The KFB increase is a simple and useful way to add a stitch in knitting. It is easy to do and does not leave any holes in your fabric.

However, it is not very invisible, so it may not be suitable for some patterns that require a smooth and even surface.

You can use the KFB increase to increase the width of your fabric, shape your garment, or create a decorative pattern.

We hope this article has helped you learn how to do the KFB increase and improve your knitting skills.

Also, read more about How To Fix Knitting Errors.

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